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J.B. Holmes

What was Going On with J.B. Holmes?

Had you wondered what was going on with J.B. Holmes? I had. As most of us know by now, he withdrew from The Barclays on the Monday, 22 August prior to the tournament to deal with his diagnosed brain malformations (Chiari) and the pending surgery. The condition creates vertigo-like symptoms which he has been working through since May of this year. Once wonders how long the balance issues have really been affecting him.

 J.B. Holmes a Proud Kentuckian

J.B. Holmes is a Kentucky boy, a product of the University of Kentucky and a hometown hero in his native Campbellsville, KY. Near the center of Kentucky, close to Lexington and just south of Bardstown (The Bourbon Capitol of the World), Campbellsville is a small community with big aspirations (now home of a Amazon.com distribution center) and home of a big hitter.

J.B. Holmes is a Winner

J.B. Holmes is a two time winner on the PGA Tour. Considered a “long ball hitter” he is also a very talented player with skills in every aspect of the game a la John Daly. J.B. Holmes distinguished himself during the 2008 (37th) Ryder Cup. Playing at Valhalla Country Club near Louisville, Kentucky, he joined fellow Kentuckian Kenny Perry in leading the U.S. to victory against the Europeans.

J.B. Holmes Will be Back

J.B. Holmes underwent successful brain surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital on Thursday, 1 September to relieve pressure on the cerebellum and brain stem that was caused by the Chiari malformations. Holmes will be recuperating for the next three months staying away from competitive golf, but he will begin light practicing within the month.  Let’s all continue to pray for a successful recovery…all that I have read tells me that he is doing well and wondering why we are all making such a fuss.  Best of luck J.B. Holmes.

The 93rd PGA Championship

The PGA Championship

I suppose the deal with the devil never really took place, or so it seems since Tiger missed the cut badly this week at the year’s final major – The 93rd PGA Championship.  But it was a terrific tournament nonetheless.  Who needs “big names” when the play is as spectacular as it was coming down the stretch of the tournament and in the ensuing playoff?  The PGA tour has obviously become very deep with talent over the course of the last few years.  In fact the last 10 majors have been won by first time major winners.  And…thank goodness an American won this last major…we can put that European uber alles issue to bed at least.  Although, I am sure there are those out there working the Irish lineage angle on Bradley as we speak…since the previous two majors were won by Irishmen.

What a Finish to the PGA

What a finish to the 93rd PGA Championship!  Keegan Bradley winning in a three hole aggregate playoff against Jason Dufner.  Keegan tied the event going birdie, birdie, and par after a seemingly disastrous triple bogey on the 15th par three.  With four holes to go and having witnessed Bradley’s triple from the tee box, Dufner hit the water on the par three 15th as well but managed a bogey to go to the 16th with a four shot lead.  He then proceeded to bogey the next two holes and par the 18th to remain tied at 8 under with Bradley.  Keegan, on his way in from the  triple on 15 knocked in a nine footer for birdie on the 16th then a thirty-five footer on the par three 17th to climb back up to 8 under par for the tournament. 

The PGA Championship Playoff

In the playoff, the two hit identical drives to the ones they played in regulation on the 16th.  Dufner, the shorter of the two hit first from the fairway and stuffed a 5 iron short of the hole rolling it just past the pin leaving about a twelve-footer.  Keegan shot next stuffing his 8 iron in to about six feet below the hole.  Keegan made his putt but Justin did not.  On the par three 17th Dufner once again three putted while Bradley made par extending his lead in the playoff to two strokes.  They both hit quality shots into the 18th hole with nearly identical putts to finish.  First to putt and with great style Jason Dufner rolled his in for a birdie forcing Bradley to two putt to win – which, of course, he did. 

The quality of the play in the playoff was spectacular with both competitors playing as if they were grizzled veterans of majors.  In fact, this was Bradley’s first ever major. 

It must be in the DNA for Keegan to deal with the pressure.  His aunt is Hall of Fame LPGA-er Pat Bradley.  His father is a PGA professional as well, not a touring pro, but a club pro in Colorado. 

The PGA Championship was a quality tournament with quality play and a terrific finish. 

Tiger at the Crossroads

Tiger in a Dream

I had a vision this morning in that dreamy state you can get into sometimes when the alarm goes off and you hit the snooze button.  My vision included Tiger making a deal with the devil…kind of like the blues guitar player at the “crossroads” or even “Damn Yankees” (the musical).  Think about it, Tiger as a boy approached by this seemingly kindly old gentleman about a deal.  Yes, Tiger had already shown some talent, but man! Oh to be as good as Jack…and even break his records! 

A Musical for Tiger

In the musical “Damn Yankees,” an aging real estate agent named Joe Boyd is lamenting about those Damned Yankees always beating his team, the Washington Senators.  If only…Joe wishes for a slugger for the Senators under his breath…then Mr. Applegate arrives (or Beelzebub, Satan, Old Horn and Hoof, the Devil) and he offers him a deal.  Long and short of it, Joe Boyd is transformed into Joe Hardy and is a batting and fielding phenom for the Senators.  Tempted by Lola (“What Lola wants, Lola gets…”) and then forlorn for his wife and home, he returns to become Joe Boyd again but only after he tricks Applegate to get his soul back. 

Tiger Makes a Deal

Now fade in to Tiger.  Imagine Tiger sitting forlornly as a young wannabe with promise…Damn Jack…if only…poof!  Here’s the devil.  Deal done, 71 tournaments and 14 majors later all is going to plan.  But while he is winning…“What the waitress wants, the waitress gets…” and another and another and another…and the Devil warns him.  “Hey Tiger!  Don’t take this thing too far…I have a plan for you.”  “No worries Devil, I got it under control.”  BAM!  We know what happens next…

Then the Devil punishes Tiger. “You’ll get it back son, but not for a little while, you’re going to feel lots of pain when you play.  More than before, this time it’ll be too much to deal with.”

Now fade in to Tiger again a couple of weeks ago.  The Devil says, “OK Tiger, I think you’ve learned your lesson.  You can play now. But first you gotta lose the caddy, he knows too much.”    

Tiger Back on Track 

Tiger wins at Bridgestone!  Waaaaaa!  How’d he do it! 

Tiger wins the PGA!  Waaaaaa!  How’d he do it? 

Tiger wins the FedEx Cup!  Waaaaaa!  How’d he do it?

Tiger is comeback player of the year!  Tiger is player of the year! 

Oh my, things are back on track. 

Ahem, but it was just a dream, wasn’t it Tiger?

Caddies – The Woods / Williams Saga

Caddies in Print

I recently bought a couple of books from Amazon.com about PGA caddies.  I am in the middle of “Piddler” Martin’s Caddie Confidential: Inside Stories from the Caddies of the PGA Tour.  Next I will read Rick Reilly’s Who’s Your Caddie? – great title.  The first thing that strikes me is that I can really identify with some of these characters.  Martin has introduced me to some caddies that could be pilots in the Marine Corps…a la Great Santini…callsigns (nicknames) and all.  “Piddler?”  What does that mean…or do I want to know?  “Junkman,” “Crispy,” “Reptile,” the Growler” (Ok, I think I know where this may have come from so I am glad the book doesn’t have an associated scratch and sniff!), “Cadillac,” etc…there are lots more.

I bought these books because my wife asked me a question about confidentiality clauses with caddies…do they have them?  I really didn’t know, and still don’t…yet.  I would guess that it depends on the player and the deals players and caddies strike.  In “Piddler’s” book, the work for most caddies seems so adhoc that I couldn’t imagine any kind of written agreement ever gets done except for maybe the really long term associations.  There also seems to be a kind of apparent camaraderie or esprit de corps amongst caddies.  At least that’s the feel I get from reading the stories to date.  It might be that the “caddie corps” used to have unwritten rules and professional standards of conduct where “tell-alls” are concerned, but Martin’s book is copyrighted in 2009, so since that’s the case it is likely to still be true.  Obviously, I still have a lot of questions.

Caddies and Tiger

Tiger hasn’t had many caddies.  Steve Williams has been with him since 1999 when Butch Harmon introduced them after Tiger fired “Fluff” Cowan.  I wonder what kind of agreement they had?  A lot of people are wondering.  Willams has a history of getting personally involved with his player.  He caddied for Greg Norman for several years until Norman fired him in 1989, but they remain friends.  Williams would later say he “got too close personally” with Norman – whatever that means – which resulted in the firing.  Williams and Woods were the best man at each other’s weddings.  Williams has been very protective of Tiger through the years and stood by him during Tiger’s personal debacle that has since been a major reason (aside from injury) for his fall from the list of top players in the world.

Caddies are People Too

Williams is no wall flower.  He speaks his mind and is not afraid to talk publically, especially in his native New Zealand, when asked about things.  He spoke disparagingly about Phil Mickelson in 2008 openly admitting an apparent mutual dislike between them.  He has most recently spoken openly about his recent firing by Tiger at the recent AT&T National.  Tiger apparently fired him because he was “disloyal.”  Williams, one of the world’s top caddies, had gained permission from Woods to caddy for Australian Adam Scott at the U.S. Open.  Later he caddied for Scott again, supposedly without permission, at the AT&T which apparently caused Tiger to take offense and ultimately let him go.

I am not sure how loyal a person has to be to keep Tiger’s affection and loyalty.  Stevie stayed beside him throughout his personal tribulations, has only worked for him through it all until the Adam Scott thing, which means not much in terms of tournament play.  Williams confessed that the timing of the firing coupled with the “disloyal” comments are what has thrown him – not necessarily the firing itself.  He “wasted the last two years…”  Apparently, for Tiger, it was time to add to his list of changes.  Change his personal conduct, change his perspective with his kids, change his conduct on course (not very successfully), change his swing coach, change his swing, change the way he deals with injury, and now change his caddy.  What’s next?

Bring in the Caddies

Who’s next?  How about “the Growler?”  Or perhaps “the Servant?”  Or maybe “the Ass Kisser?”  Word of advice caddies… keep it strictly professional.

The Eternal Summer Review

Summer of 1960 – The Eternal Summer

Curt Sampson wrote The Eternal Summer which was published in 1992, almost 20 years ago.  I happened to find a signed copy of the book and read it over the course of the last couple of weeks.  It is required reading for those who profess to follow and know golf.  1960 was a year to remember.  It was literally a turning point for American society shifting out of the post World War II Eisenhower era and the societal innocence of the 1950s into a more hip and rebellious period.  It was also the year I was born – an important year indeed…

The Eternal Summer and the Changing of the Guard

Television was a catalyst for this change – it changed how we viewed candidates for president of the United States and how we viewed golf and its heroes.  It was the year Arnold Palmer was born as a golfing superstar, the birth of Arnie’s Army and a seed for sports management that sparked the path for players to treat the PGA Tour as a major business venture.  It was also the year that the U.S. Open at Cherry Hills marked the changing of the old guard in golf through Ben Hogan’s last stand, Arnold Palmer’s triumph, and a glimpse of the promise of the champion to come, Jack Nicklaus.

In The Eternal Summer, Curt Sampson takes us through the year by way of the brief histories of the three gentlemen mentioned above and the year’s major tournaments.  He fills in the blanks with personalities of golf, personalities around golf, the birth of the modern PGA Tour, and the shift of golf as an exclusively rich past-time to a game of the masses.

Irrepressible Dan Jenkins provides the forward where he calls 1960 one of four significant years of the game.  Arguably, there are now five as we have since realized the “Tiger Era,” but of course, that is accounted for I am sure in countless books that I have yet to read.  Come to think of it, we may have six as I believe we are in the “post-Tiger Era” now defined by his instant downfall a couple of years ago.  More of that in my analysis of the implications of Tiger’s fall in a later post.

The Eternal Summer – A Must Read

As I said, it is a must read about what Curt Sampson calls “golf’s golden year.”  The Eternal Summmer is entertaining, informative, and quick.  It will stay on my shelf as a reference for this important historical point for the game we love.  It is a great place to start, a nexus if you will for exploration of the history of the game.  Buy and read The Eternal Summer, you won’t be disappointed.

Tee It Forward

Tee It Forward Initiative

I first heard of this initiative on the Sirius/XM PGA Tour Network shows Fairways of Life with Matt Adams and Teed Off with Brian Katrek.  In their respective shows, Matt and Brian each invited callers to comment on the concept – Tee It Forward.  Then, a couple of days ago I stumbled on a GolfWorld.com article addressing the initiative as well and thought I would put some brain cells on it myself.

Essentially, the concept is that the majority of golfers out there should move forward one set of tee markers to “boost fun and speed up play” during 5-17 July 2011 (Golfworld.com/The Game July 4 2011).

I think the desired effect is to bring awareness to leisure golfers that golf courses designed for championship play are not necessarily suited (from the back tees) for the games of the average golfer.  As reported by GolfWorld.com, an article in Golf Digest attributes the idea to Barney Adams (Adams Golf).  Mr. Adams calculates “that the amateur who drives the ball 200 to 230 yards should be playing courses measuring about 6000 yards.”  Essentially, this is an effort to encourage average golfers to play the course from a tee that best suits their game.  In theory, this will make the game more fun for them and speed up play.  I think it is a great idea, but how to implement it and see that it has lasting effects?

Tee It Forward –Implementation

Golf is a game that has been in a bit of a down swing (so to speak), with the economy such as it is and the expense of playing (golf is generally not a cheap sport), the rising tide of new joins to the game from the “Tiger Era” has been ebbing.  The following link will take you to an interview of Brian Katrek regarding Tiger pre-Masters, but what is important in the interview by Fox Business News is the commentary by Brian on the current state of golf – http://video.foxbusiness.com/v/4627876/brian-katrek-tigers-not-ready-to-retire-/.  This is excellent commentary and clear and understandable reasoning – thanks Brian.

Jack Nicklaus and others think that perhaps 18 holes is too many for the masses and that there should be an intermediate number available – say 12 that one could purchase to play – not too much and not too little for those who don’t have 4.5 to 5.5 hours to burn.  I have heard discussion on the PGA Tour Network regarding the need to get more women involved in the sport, make the sport more “female friendly.”  Now, Tee It Forward comes to the fore as an initiative to make golf “more fun” for the masses (and potentially provide for more through-put on the courses positively affecting revenue?)

How does one get traction on an initiative like this so that its positive effects last?  GolfWorld posits three areas of refinement to the existing plan (which seems somewhat voluntary and without a lot of marketing):

  1. Somehow change mistaken mindsets that shifting to forward tees for players within a group takes more time and slows play.  As they put it, gain “permission to play shorter tees.”
  2. Create and “include a chart correlating 10 driver distances to a similar number of recommended 18 hole yardages.”  That is, I suppose, if you hit a driver 200 yards you should play an 18 hole length of 6000 yards, 220 yards is 6300 yards, etc…Perhaps even a “professional assessment” provided by a course pro with a range of clubs.
  3. Finally, charge differently by tee marker…the shorter, the less you pay.  (This has the most promise in my view.)

Tee It Forward – More Ideas

We already have a handicapping system.  Why can’t courses check handicaps?  Limit play on select back tees to certain handicap levels – always, sometimes, whatever….  If you don’t have a handicap, it is likely an indication that you aren’t necessarily a serious golfer and that perhaps you should be on one of the forward tees.  The course at Camp LeJeune, NC has two 18 hole tracks – the scarlet and the gold.  The gold is the championship course and the scarlet is a bit shorter, but both are equally playable and enjoyable.  The rule there used to be anyway that during certain hours on Saturday and Sunday, you (and your group) must have established handicaps to make a tee time on the gold.  Everyone else plays the scarlet.  Now, I realize that there aren’t many courses out there with multiple tracks, but the idea can be implemented as part of the tee it forward program.  Rather than restricting the golf course, restrict the tees so that non-handicap holders play to the forward tees during the busiest weekend hours.

Also, maybe we should standardize tee colors as well.  I venture that a lot of players see white tees and use them.  White is somewhat universal for ‘average player tees,’ but the difficulty is not all courses use the same colors.   I think it somewhat universal that ladies tees are red, senior tees gold, forward men’s tees white, and then you have one or two sets back beyond that – normally blue next, then black championship tees.  What’s wrong with establishing a standard in the industry?  Even if you have something cute as tee markers – cannons or rocks or garden gnomes – they can have the standard color motif can’t they?

Finally, change where you set the tees.  Move the ‘standard’ white ones up permanently from where they have been historically if the yardage at the old place was too long by Mr. Adam’s standard.  It may cost a little to recalculate slope and rating and publish the new yardage on the score sheets, but If it achieves the desired result, it would be well worth it.

Tee It Forward – Bottom Line

There are probably a myriad of ways to implement, but there will still be those who want to play the full course no matter their skill level.  In the end the customer is right, right?  Well, maybe on a municipal course or even a resort course, but I venture a country club can do what it wants provided the constituency allows.

I think the effort has merit, but it will require a multi-faceted approach.  First, standardize tee colors to eliminate confusion – I mean establish an industry standard.  Next, just move a set forward of where they are now (white ones) to better fit the 6000-6300 yard model.  Then, communicate with your customers.  Illustrate why it makes sense with charts that show with common sense language why it will be more fun to change – it has to be direct, simple and to the point.  And finally, there must be monetary incentive to change.  If you simply charge more for each tee back from the white, then you punish good players.  Perhaps you can charge more unless you have an established handicap that is below a certain threshold that allows you to pay the same as those on the white. People who do not belong on the back tees should pay more… I think that is the point.  But, make no mistake, managing price by tee will create the quickest change.

Golf’s Sacred Journey…to the Website

Golf’s Sacred Journey Review

Okay, after I read Golf’s Sacred Journey and after I posted commentary on the book I went back to the website to study it some more. I have to say as I looked closely through the pages a feeling of disappointment fell over me.

Golf’s Sacred Journey Website

I stand by my comments on the book in my previous post, but I cannot recommend the website and some of the “continuing actions” the author asks us to take. It feels…well…like the author is cashing in and the whole thing feels a bit “cultish.” Not sure I actually want to go on a Golf’s Sacred Journey Retreat or start a Golf’s Sacred Journey Group or even belong to one. Not sure I even know anyone who would want to do something like that.

Golf’s Sacred Journey and “Ministering the Faith”

I understand that this is a means to minister to others the Christian faith. I am a Christian. But I also understand that the ministry is asking me to buy 100 books and send them out. Buy 100 books? Buy 10 books? I thought of buying a few books to send to people I care about, but I wanted them to read it and take from it what I did, not enter into a religious pyramid scheme.

No, I haven’t yet seen Golf’s Sacred Journey the movie. I will eventually. I will read the book again as well. I will not go back to the website.

Feherty is a Hit!

Feherty is a Human After All

I was really looking forward to seeing this and I missed the first show. But luckily I caught it when it was re-aired by the Golf Channel later in the week. I am really happy I did and I intend to watch every week. The Golf Channel has done it right with David Feherty ‘s show. This is not another gratuitous ride on a personality like Donald Trump, but a thoughtful, yet humorous romp through the human condition with golf as the backdrop. It is quirky yet informative, it is real and funny, and it is entertaining. It was a brilliant stroke to bring on Lee Trevino for the first show. He is such a delightful soul, and I learned some things about him I would otherwise not have known. (Semper fi Lee) One might think with Trevino and Feherty that it would be too much personality and they might clash, but David Feherty has been in this business long enough to know when to let the “horse run” and when to interject his humor and comment.

Feherty is More Than Golf

This is a show that it is not limited to the niche world of The Golf Channel, it would thrive on a major network channel. There is human interest and humor in it that transcends knowledge of golf – even though it’s central theme is obviously golf. Feherty brings his history of addiction, his resume as a professional golfer and golf analyst, and a lovable personality and sense of humor flavored with the slight edge of “I’ve been there, you’re not going to bullshit me” thrown in. Feherty has risen from some depths most of us could not and he is now giving at every turn. From working with the Troops First Foundation (internal link) to visiting them in country, he has become an American in every sense of the word and lives it passionately. His show could have been too silly, but thankfully it is not. Feherty is just the right mix of fun and lore…and personal example.

Make Time to Watch Feherty

Airing at 9 PM on Tuesday nights on The Golf Channel, Feherty has to become a favorite of golfers. And, as I alluded to above, the show has great entertainment value to non-golfers as well. Unfortunately, I am not sure how many non-golfers will tune in…perhaps through its ‘affiliation’ with NBC, they will advertise outside of The Golf Channel (they may be already, but I am not aware) to draw the folks in. At any rate, if you have not yet seen Feherty, tune in – I promise you will be entertained.

Rory McIlroy Wins 2011 U.S. Open at Congressional

What a U.S. Open Weekend!

Rory McIlroy at 2011 U.S. Open

Rory McIlroy at 2011 U.S. Open

Rory McIlroy wins the U.S. Open,  his first major, in a storm of scoring on a weakened, yet still long Congressional Country Club golf course. As I watched Rory throughout the tournament I was impressed with his poise and patience, not only on the course, but off as well. I can only imagine how many times he has answered the questions regarding his Masters back nine fall a few weeks before. Even Bob Costas’ ill-timed inappropriate question about The Masters during the championship award ceremony did not phase Rory, but who would have blamed him if it did? (Come on Bob, save those questions for the post tournament press conference!) But Rory has grown up in preparation for this moment. He has proven to be gracious in losing, and now gracious in winning. He is delightful to watch.

A Vulnerable U.S. Open Golf Course

The course was vulnerable this week. With the rough down somewhat in anticipation for hard and fast greens and then rains softening the greens during the tournament, the course was ripe for better than normal U.S. Open scoring…and there was better than normal U.S. Open scoring. Not taking anything away from Rory’s performance as he did lap the field, but there were lots of players under par (20 including Rory). Also, an accomplishment of very few in past, he was not the only player to shoot all four rounds under par – he was joined by Robert Garrigus (T3), although Rory did so with all 4 in the 60’s (65/66/68/69). Garrigus shot 70 3 times making a tough clutch par putt on 18 to make it happen.

Who Showed at the U.S. Open & Who Didn’t

Jason Day once again showed brilliance in a major finishing alone in second. We saw some small glimpses of the Sergio of old. Chappel and Garrigus were the lone Americans in the top 10 at 6 under par, T3 along with Y.E. Yang and Lee Westwood. Where was Phil, Luke and Martin?  The amateur Patrick Cantlay (pictured behind Rory), an incoming 19 year old sophomore at UCLA and the world’s number one amateur, did spectacularly carding an even par score for the tournament and taking low amateur honors.  His next amateur competitor was Russell Henley, a Georgia Bulldog, finishing at 4 over par.

U.S. Open Coverage

It was an interesting dynamic to watch the U.S. Open as broadcasts switched from ESPN to NBC then to ESPN again on Thursday and Friday. What a dichotomy of announcers and styles! I also listened to part on Sirius/XM ESPN. NBC televised the Saturday and Sunday rounds and we got our fill of Johnny Miller. I have to say, I would much rather watch and listen to Curtis Strange (he was broadcasting on radio) than Miller. Miller seemed to be manufacturing scenarios to make it more “interesting.” He was a little out of character I think in his incessant praise of McIlroy’s swing. Usually he will find something wrong somewhere.

What was NBC thinking when they edited out “under God” from the American pledge of allegiance in their tribute to American patriotism? Does that strike anyone else as a strange juxtaposition, to edit a pledge in a tribute to patriotism?! Did they think that most people hadn’t said it in so long that no one would remember it and it would just pass? The apology was lame. As if they simply mistakenly edited out the words. There is no doubt in my mind that it was intentional. What arrogance! Whoever made that decision needs to be fired. We just don’t change the words to fit our agendas…

U.S. Open Repercussions?

A thought came to me that maybe this is just the kind of motivation to bring Tiger out of his funk. Sure, he has injury, but motivation is key to recovery. Doubters of this theory would say that surpassing Jack’s major total is enough motivation. Is it? Now, after the personal failures and the inner searching Tiger is obviously undertaking to find his new self? Maybe this surge of 20-something talent will bring out a hungry Tiger. Just a thought.

Thanks Rory for a great U.S. Open showing!  You’re a great Champion.

The “Golf Boys!”

Golf Boys Debut

There are some stodgy old golf purists out there that are spewing coffee through their nostrils this morning after watching the latest video Ben Crane (and sponsor?) has put out. But it isn’t only Ben Crane  now – he has enlisted (or they have jumped on the wagon) some of professional golf’s best young players to take part in this hilariously funny, self-deprecating, and dare I say it – exciting – video.

Golf Boys Intro at U.S. Open

I get the electronic version of Golf World Magazine via email and came across this in their 6/16/2011 “Things We’re Talking About” article.  There is a great photo of the Golf Channel guys (Rich Lerner, Brandel Chamblee, and Frank Nobilo) and our 4 amigos Ben Crane , Hunter Mahan, Rickie Fowler , and Bubba Watson at the desk with Congressional in the background laughing it up over the video.  I clicked the link to the video of the “Golf Boys” that Golf World provided.  My first impression was, Man, I want to watch these guys play golf!  My wife watched the video with me, she is not a golfer, and she had the same reaction.  To quote the Guiness guys – Brilliant!”

Golf World – “…this is probably not a video Hogan would have made.”

Watch the Golf Boys video (below)!  Ben Crane is consistent with his wardrobe of a red wetsuit and black open face scooter helmet from previous hilarious videos.  But then there is Hunter Mahan in tights, a furry jacket, and a scraggly beard looking like a “mod squad Viking”…hey Hunter, what’s in your wallet?” And Bubba Watson, of course, Bubba is from Baghdad, Florida and in Baghdad everyone knows that denim over-alls is the way to go to get that “feel all free underneath feeling.”  If you need advice on getting that feeling, just call BR549 – Junior may answer, just ask for Bubba.  And finally, there’s Rickie.  Isn’t it most appropriate that Rickie looks like he just stepped out of a session with the Backstreet Boys?  If only his lip synching was as good as theirs – : )

The Golf Boys Video

Golf Boys for Fun and Charity

This is masterful marketing, fun, and good for charity.  Yes, if anyone buys the song “Oh Oh Oh” on iTunes, all proceeds go to charity.  Farmer’s Insurance will certainly benefit from some You Tube play – this thing has probably already gone viral.

It’s something to see these guys loose and off the course and the humor makes you want to root for them.  Now, I am not going to go out and buy an orange get up to play golf in, but I am now more of a fan of these guys than I was before.  Thanks again Ben for bringing out the best…well, the fun and personality.  Everyone knows the players work hard, but it’s good for the public to see their “other side.”

Ok, enough of the open shirt stuff golf boys, follow Ben’s lead and get a wet suit – but not too tight.

(Look for “The Making of Oh Oh Oh” with the Golf Boys on Ben‘s website:  http://www.bencranegolf.com/)